Join Us at Council to Lobby for a Public Bank

What if the City had its own bank and no longer had to leave its billions of reserve dollars to the tender mercies of Wall St? Pipe dream? Hardly. A public bank was established in North Dakota 100 years ago, and it’s still going strong. It can happen here in Philly, if we have the will to push our elected officials.

Join us as we spend Thursday, March 21st to learn about the wonders of public banking, and how to talk about it. Then we’ll carry our message to City Council.

Sign up here to let us know you’ll join us.

Here’s more about how the day will go on March 21st.

At 11:00 AM, we’ll gather in the Chapel at Arch Street United Methodist Church, 55 N. Broad Street, just north of City Hall. There we will hear from public banking experts on the benefits a public bank would bring to all Philadelphians, particularly those who are most marginalized. Then over lunch, we’ll gather with folks from our own Councilmanic District to go over our talking points. Finally, at around 12:30 PM, we’ll head over to City Hall to engage with Council members.

Entering into a local election season, this is our greatest opportunity over the next four years to create a Philadelphia Public Bank and free our City from Wall Street’s grip. I hope you will join us in this effort by…

SIGNING UP HERE.

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